If emphasis patrols in the city of Yakima won't stop drivers from running red lights how about Red Light cameras in city intersections? In 2021 the Yakima Police Department made a presentation to the city about installing Red Light cameras to help put a stop to the problem. The considered the cameras but found them to be a costly investment.

AUTHORITIES ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE COST

Yakima Police Chief Matt Murray spoke with two companies that operate the cameras in the state. He talked to them about the red-light cameras and speed cameras to cut down on street racing. The red-light cameras that take pictures of license plates of vehicles that run red lights and issue citations are expensive to lease. Estimated costs in 2021 were about $4,500 per month or $54,000 annually per camera.

PLENTY OF CRITICS ARE OUT THERE

Officials say the cameras could bring in annual revenue of $200,000 in citations. But the high costs of installing and operating the cameras are the main reason why the city hasn't committed to Red Light cameras.
The cameras have critics.
Studies show that minor damage rear end collisions "greatly" increase because so many people are concerned about getting tickets for not stopping at the lights.  Also, a substantial  back up of traffic happens because of drivers not wanting to make free right turns because they're concerned of tripping the system and getting a citation.

SOME PEOPLE HAVE PRIVACY CONCERNS  HOW ABOUT YOU?

Red light cameras are often controversial due to concerns about privacy, accuracy, and fairness.
Critics argue that the systems may be prone to errors and false positives, targeting drivers who are not necessarily breaking the law. There are also concerns about ticketing the registered owner of a vehicle rather than the actual driver who may have been behind the wheel at the time of the violation.

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