Dems try to disrupt GOP Smiley's results watch party (Smiley-Twitter)
Dems try to disrupt GOP Smiley's results watch party (Smiley-Twitter)
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The specific location was not given but presumed in the Seattle-King County area

Democratic protestors try to disrupt GOP candidate's watch party

MyNorthwest.com reported Wednesday that a small but loud group of Democratic protestors tried to gather outside of a venue where GOP Senate Candidate Tiffany Smiley was holding a results watch party.

Smiley is married to decorated Iraqi Veteran Scott Smiley (who was blinded by a suicide bomber in 2005.  She hails from Eastern WA, and after his injury, took up the fight with her husband to ensure veterans receive the care and respect they deserve. That road has eventually led to her running against incumbent Patty Murray for one of the US Senate Congressional seats this year.

She has polled very well, and her message has resonated with voters.

Democrats trying to make it about abortion rights

Smiley said she applauded the overturning of Roe vs. Wade because it took the issue of abortion rights out of the hands of judges and put it in the hands of states and legislators. While Democrats are trying to pin her as a one-issue candidate, spreading 'fear-mongering' about her rubber-stamping GOP legislators on abortion if she wins, Smiley counters by saying Democrats are doing that because Murray cannot stand on her record.

Smiley also countered by saying Murray has gone along with all of Joe Biden's disastrous policies that have led to near-record inflation, high energy prices, and other hardships for Americans.

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The protestors attempted to disrupt the watch party, but no evidence their gathering outside had any effect on the attendees inside. Smiley and Murray both will advance to the November election.

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